A fresh perspective

Recently, a client came to me with a problem; one that was causing all sorts of unrest in their life. They struggled to sleep at night for worrying, and this had animpact on their waking hours, as they were tired and irritable, and they foundthemselves becoming consumed with trying to find an answer to the ‘problem’. Many people, including myself, have had this type of experience before, and it is not apleasant place to be in, therefore I was able to empathise to a degree on the emotions involved. What I believe works for the all of my clients, is … Continue reading A fresh perspective

Post Cardio Therapies

If you have had a Heart attack or similar cardio event, recovery can be slow and frustrating to many people. You can change your life around and become more optimistic about the future. I am walking breathing testimony that this is possible with some guidance and a determination to succeed! When I first created Change Therapy many years ago, the aim was to provide extra support to survivors of cardio events by introducing gentle therapies that we could work through together, to benefit your overall wellbeing. This includes altering your outlook on life, and learning how to be more positive … Continue reading Post Cardio Therapies

Loneliness

One of the most frequent issues that clients bring to my sessions is loneliness. One general assumption of loneliness is that you are an elderly person with little contact with the outside world. From my experiences these past few years, the people that are lonely, come from age-groups starting in late teens upwards. One individual’s story springs to mind, where they said they were lonely, and could not fathom out what to do. A young man with a job and a house, with lots to offer, but no-one to share life with. He wanted to go on holiday abroad, go … Continue reading Loneliness

Mindfulness

The term “mindfulness” refers to a compassionate and clear-headed awareness, or the awareness of what is occurring simultaneously in the external and internal worlds. The majority of us are more accustomed to its opposite: mindlessness, which refers to situations in which we are not fully aware of what is happening and are therefore more likely to make mistakes. In order to make informed decisions, mindfulness entails waking up and paying attention to the present moment. A specific method of being present in the moment is mindfulness. The mind is less prone to become ensnared in negative thought and emotion patterns … Continue reading Mindfulness

MBCT

Mindfulness-based cognitive therapy improves on the ideas of cognitive therapy by teaching people to deliberately pay attention to their thoughts and feelings without passing judgement on them, utilising techniques such as mindfulness meditation. Cognitive therapy’s basic tenet is that incorrect self-beliefs cause unpleasant feelings like depression and that thoughts come before moods. To assist you in identifying and re-evaluating your negative thought patterns and replacing them with more realistically optimistic ones, MBCT makes use of cognitive therapy techniques. This method enables people to reflect on their ideas without being pre-occupied with what may have been or what might happen in … Continue reading MBCT

Mindfulness of Anger

Anger is an unpleasant feeling. It is like a blazing flame that burns up our self-control and causes us to say and do things that we regret later. When someone is angry, we can see that they are in a form of hell, a cycle of never-ending rage. Anger and hatred are the materials in which hell is made. A mind without anger is cool, fresh and rational. The absence of anger is the basis of real happiness; the basis of love and compassion. When our anger us placed under the spotlight of Mindfulness, it immediately begins to lose some … Continue reading Mindfulness of Anger

Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Abraham Maslow was a psychologist in the twentieth century who pioneered the humanistic approach to psychology. He is best known for his hierarchy of needs. Maslow believed that human wants may be structured into a hierarchy, in order to better understand what motivates people. This hierarchy includes everything from basic needs like food and water to more complex ideals like self-fulfilment. When a lower need is met, the following needs in the hierarchy become our centre of attention, according to Maslow. These are the five categories of needs according to Maslow: Physiological Physiological needs – these are biological need for … Continue reading Maslow’s Hierarchy of Needs

Endometriosis

Recently when talking with a client, she said that she suffered from severe endometriosis and that her life was unbearable at times because of this disease. Many of her issues stemmed from the fact that it was almost impossible to have the medical team in her area acknowledge that Endometriosis was as severe as she described it. Endometriosis does to qualify you for benefits as it is not recognised as a disability. She felt alone, in pain and lost, which increased her anxieties dealing with general day to day life. Her partner tried to help, but Endometriosis is an ‘invisible’ … Continue reading Endometriosis

Secret Garden – Mindfulness

Recently I held a Mindfulness session at one of the most beautiful and serene places in Edinburgh, and it has had such an impact on many people, that I wanted to share this with you. Thankfully we arrived on a day where the weather was almost perfect, with a little frost underfoot, yet we were fortunate that the usual cold biting wind from the adjacent loch, was not present by late morning. The Secret Garden is formally known as Dr. Neil’s Garden, which lies next to Duddingston Kirk, built in 1124, at the foot of Arthurs Seat, which is an … Continue reading Secret Garden – Mindfulness

Age is just a number!

Recently, I was going through the family photo album with my children. “Who was that young man with the flared jeans and long hair” they asked? I remember the style of that era very well, and yes that was me alright – it seemed like not so long ago, maybe a couple of years at most?! We carry on looking through the photo album and come across another person I could not quite fathom out who, but it was familiar.. When I look at the old man in the photos, with receding hair and plain looking clothes, I stop myself … Continue reading Age is just a number!

Panic Attack

Experiencing a panic attack is not simply about experiencing a moment of severe fright or nerves. They run much deeper than that. Contrary to popular belief, experiencing a panic attack is not simply about experiencing a moment of severe fright or nerves when you are about to make that speech in front of five hundred people or the morning of that important meeting or exam you have been preparing for. Panic attacks run much deeper than that. Some symptoms of panic attacks include: Out of body feeling Breathlessness Chest pains Palpitations and racing heart Feeling of impending doom or death … Continue reading Panic Attack

Our Nervous System – Fear

When we are afraid of a situation, the brain sends a signal to the body to prepare itself. Have you ever wondered at the complexity of the processes involved? I don’t imagine we have time to think about the goings on inside, when faced with Fear, however it is worth knowing more if only to understand what really goes on “behind the scenes”. First of all, it is useful to know how our Nervous System actually works. The Nervous System consists of 2 parts known as the Voluntary and Involuntary Systems. The Voluntary Nervous System controls the movement of our … Continue reading Our Nervous System – Fear

Weighted Blankets

What Is a Weighted Blanket? Occupational therapists have been prescribing weighted blankets to help manage sensory-related symptoms for decades – especially for children and adults on the Autism spectrum. A weighted blanket is a specially made therapeutic blanket with some additional weight, generally weighing between 5 to 30 pounds. They come in different weights to accommodate the user’s size. The idea behind weighted blankets is to make them a little heavy so they can apply a firm pressure on the user’s body. Depending on the manufacturer, these blankets are filled with different weighted materials, including barley, glass beads or even some kind … Continue reading Weighted Blankets

Autism and Increased risk of Covid

Recently the US Government started to offer Covid vaccinations to children aged 12 +, and hopefully the UK and other Nation’s Goverments around the world will follow suit. While there are many differences of opinion on whether vaccinations should be given to young children, I wanted to outline some recent research highlighting the increased risk of death for people with Developmental or Intellectual disabilities. As this affects both my children; one with Autism, and the other having an Intellectual Disability, I am very keen to protect them from the virus, even more so since reading the following information. Individuals with … Continue reading Autism and Increased risk of Covid

The first Self Help book

On the days we all experience at one time or another, when one hundred and one things have to be attended to immediately, if not sooner, try keeping the following words in mind: “The shortest way to do many things is to do only one thing at once.” Written by Samuel Smiles, a doctor, writer and social reformer. He was born in Haddington (my hometown), Scotland in 1812. His book, Self-Help, was published in 1859 and was a best seller book, selling a 1/4 million copies, to the British public. In the book, he proposes knowledge as one of the … Continue reading The first Self Help book

Post-Cardio recovery

I offer Psychotherapy sessions for survivors of heart attacks/cardio events, which are available at my other website: Adjustment Therapy, however the Covid pandemic impacted on my ability to provide any sort of face to face therapy, even with masks, so this was not an option. It has not been safe for me to go out since March 2020 because of the risk of getting the Covid virus and only now, with the vaccine being available to me by May this year, I plan to offer Therapy sessions for people of all ages, who have been affected by a recent Cardio … Continue reading Post-Cardio recovery

Good friendship qualities

What are good friendship qualities? It comes down to 5 crucial qualities in my opinion, yet there may be more. Anyone wish to comment? Nourish. The friendship nourishes both individuals. Each feels supported and cared for and both look forward to each other’s company. Trust. Each knows they can count on each other to be honest and accepting, even when one or both change. Commitment. Both are prepared to put time and effort into the relationship even when physically apart. Balance. The give and take of a relationship balances out over time, as each provide support when required. Relationship. This … Continue reading Good friendship qualities

Adolphe Quetete and BMI?

Today is World Obesity Day (4th March 2021) Body Mass Index (BMI) is a calculation of body fat on the basis of height and weight applying to adult men and women. Your Body Mass Index score indicates whether you are underweight or overweight. Based on the score that you get, you may be advised to bulk up or lose weight. It is done to ensure that you maintain a bodyweight that may be healthy, and you may be advised to change your lifestyle to attain a healthier BMI. The BMI scale was developed in 1832 by a Belgian mathematician named … Continue reading Adolphe Quetete and BMI?

Are you being nudged?

Do you make choices of your own free will, or are you being nudged along by an unseen force to comply? The Government, Retail and Medical professions, amongst many other industries employ strategies to shape your behaviour. Nudge theory is the science behind subtly leading people to the ‘right’ decision. It works on the principle that small actions can have a substantial impact on the way people behave. For organisations wanting to drive positive behaviour change, it’s a handy concept to know about. Nudge theory is also concerned with the design of choices, which influences the decisions we make. Nudge theory … Continue reading Are you being nudged?

Uncertainty

All around the world, people remain uncertain about the future. I don’t know what the outcome will be, however I have continued to use some strategies to keep myself going. I want to share them with you, in the hope that you may get some benefit from this particular method. A) Do something every day to reduce anxiety; whether it is a relaxation technique, exercising or getting in touch with some friends. This all amounts to finding some calm in your daily existence. B) Stay informed. Decide to allocate yourself 30 minutes each day to check the Local news and … Continue reading Uncertainty

Balance and Dizziness (vestibular) Disorders

Originally posted on View from Over the Hill:
Since Dr. Graham Bryce and I started the B C Balance & Dizziness Disorders Society (BADD) 15 years ago, I’ve talked with hundreds and hundreds of members dealing with vestibular disorders. When our first Board met around my kitchen table, we discussed a name for our fledgling support group. I noted that “Balance and Dizziness Disorders” which was chosen, would probably have the acronym BADD, which might not look good. The response? “Well, it IS bad.” So “BADD” we became. Balance and Dizziness Disorders ARE bad Through the years, members complain that… Continue reading Balance and Dizziness (vestibular) Disorders

Giving something back.

I predominantly offer Psychotherapy sessions for parents/carers of children who are on the Autistic spectrum or who have Special Needs. We walk and talk in Nature, rather than sit inside a room, and this form of therapy is found to be more relaxing, while enjoying the natural environment. There are not many people who can afford to pay out in excess of £50 for an hour of Counselling or Psychotherapy, as these sessions are never just once a week; they go on for weeks, months and sometimes longer. This is an expensive outlay for most people. As a parent of … Continue reading Giving something back.

Beware of Shovelling Snow

Every winter, about 100 people in the US die while shovelling snow. Why? A study looking at data from 1990 to 2006 by researchers at the US Nationwide Children’s Hospital recorded 1,647 fatalities from cardiac-related injuries associated with shovelling snow. In Canada, these deaths make the news every winter. Cardiologist Barry Franklin, an expert in the hazardous effects of snow removal, believes the number of deaths could be double that. “I believe we lose hundreds of people each year because of this activity,” says Franklin, director of preventative cardiology and cardiac rehabilitation at William Beaumont Hospital, Michigan. His team found … Continue reading Beware of Shovelling Snow

Listening to your partner

I was reading an article in a newspaper the other day, about a GP Doctor, who was enjoying his usual cup of coffee and cereal with his wife, one morning somewhere in the UK. His wife noticed that some cereal was dribbling down his mouth, and it was uncharacteristic of her husband not to clean it up immediately. She also suggested that his speech was a little slurred, but she was brushed off as being ‘silly’. He struggled a little bit with the keyboard on the computer, but again, he thought this could be anything. The Doctor went about his … Continue reading Listening to your partner

Body Image

Body image is something that many people are concerned about and which has a negative effect on their Mental Health. Feelings of being low or depressed contribute to anxieties around their appearance, especially when out in the public domain. Finding clothes that change our outward appearance helps, yet it is inside that the greatest challenges are, which thousands of people have to face each day of their lives. Below are some suggestions which may help in coping with Body image: Practice Mindfulness – this involves breathing methods, guided imagery, and other practices to relax the body and mind and help … Continue reading Body Image

Coping with Fear

Fear is one of the most powerful emotions; it has a very strong effect on your mind and body. Fear can create strong signals of response when we’re in emergencies; it can also take effect when you’re faced with non-dangerous events, like exams, public speaking, a new job, a date, or even a party. It’s a natural response to a threat that can be either perceived or real. Fear and anxiety can last for a short time and then pass, but they can also last much longer and you can get stuck with them. In some cases they can take … Continue reading Coping with Fear

Finding Meaning – Every Day

It is easy to become complacent in life and just do enough to get by. Have you taken things for granted? Can you be quite content to let others do the running? We all get like this at one time or another, and it is easy to sit back and watch. I was on the phone to a friend the other day asking how they were, and they said that they were lacking motivation to get up and do anything; preferring to watch some box-sets on Netflix for a few days, eating the remains of the Christmas chocolates and other … Continue reading Finding Meaning – Every Day

Have a Nap

In need of a quick shut-eye? Don’t ignore your body and take some time to re-energize throughout the day. Maybe you didn’t get enough sleep last night, or just feel lethargic and cannot be bothered. There are many positive reasons for finding some time during the day to have some ‘me-time’ by closing your eyes for a quick nap. Naps boost alertness and improve motor performance, which is why you should feel energized after taking one. The length of your nap determines the benefits. 10 minutes to 30 minutes, may make you feel groggy on waking, but your body will … Continue reading Have a Nap

Coping with Anxiety – Improve Fitness

Change Therapy – Ways to cope with anxiety during and after COVID-19 3 – Improve fitness Being advised to stay inside your home during this pandemic has its challenges, which may also have increased the level of anxieties experienced. It is a worrying time regarding the health of the people in the world, but you have to try and concentrate on YOU for now. If you were to remain seated watching TV or sleeping most of the day away, adding in the extra comfort eating while being entertained, it is reasonable to presume that your weight will increase too. It … Continue reading Coping with Anxiety – Improve Fitness

Coping with Anxiety – Engaging in a Useful Activity

Change Therapy – Ways to cope with anxiety during and after COVID-19   1 – Engage in a Useful Activity Concern over the outbreak of the Coronavirus is perfectly common. Some individuals, however, can experience extreme anxiety which can affect their everyday lives. My first suggestion to help manage anxiety in this present situation, would be to try and engage your brain in a useful activity. I am not talking about watching the latest box set of your favourite drama on TV! Decide to tidy up one room in your house, like a spring cleaning? Go through your items and … Continue reading Coping with Anxiety – Engaging in a Useful Activity