Loneliness

The word loneliness is one that is never really mentioned, except in the news or by people talking about others. It is viewed as a desperate sort of subject and one best avoided, as it only affects certain types etc etc. Loneliness is a subjective feeling about the gap between a person’s desired levels of social contact and their actual level of social contact. It refers to the perceived quality of the person’s relationships. Loneliness is never desired and lessening these feelings can take a long time. Social isolation is an objective measure of the number of contacts that people … Continue reading Loneliness

Humility

Humility: Letting someone ahead of you in line when you see they are in a hurry is an act of humility. Cleaning the bathroom of your office, even though you own the company, is an example of humility. … An athlete who credits his success to his teammates, even though he has great skill, shows humility. If you would like to learn how to re-balance your outlook on life, here are some pointers: Listen and empathise – Listening empathetically to others shows you value them, and may clarify what you do and do not know. Become more curious – Opening … Continue reading Humility

A good therapist

  The talking therapies are a form of storytelling, where many conclusions are possible. A good therapist teaches you to get along with the world, not to blow it up. Mindfulness walks can help you get some peace and quiet in your mind, and help to offload some of the negativity surrounding your life. Come and join me for an hour that will start to change your life.     Continue reading A good therapist

Non-Surgery

Western medicine emphasizes surgery far too much. Doctors want to take out things that are not wanted. When we have something irregular in our body, too often they advise us to have an operation. The same seems true in psychotherapy. Most therapists want to help us throw out what is unwanted and keep only what is wanted. But what is left may not be very much. If we try to throw away what we don’t want, we may throw away most of  ourselves. Here at Change Therapy, I will help you transform your life and find a way to remain … Continue reading Non-Surgery

How to deal with Quiet Stress.

How to deal with Quiet Stress “Despite getting a bad rap over the years, expressing anger or frustration is far healthier than smiling sweetly while feeling quietly stressed.” according to Prof Cooper of Manchester University. “There is a growing epidemic of people who don’t voice their anger, and suffer just as much.” When she was growing up, Kate was aware her father had a temper. “He would fly off the handle very easily. My mother was forever telling him to calm down before he had a heart attack,” she remembers. “Growing up, if my brother or I ever lost our … Continue reading How to deal with Quiet Stress.

Can you train yourself to be more optimistic?

  Can you train yourself to be more optimistic? In this current pandemic you may ask? With so much depressing news filtering in to our living rooms these days, the general mood of society is one of despair and sadness. Lockdowns restricting where we can go, and social distancing in place preventing us from human contact that we seek. If you want to change the way that you feel, try and learn one of, or all of the following: Widen your possibilities. Whenever you catch yourself expecting a catastrophe, stop. That is only one possibility. Imagine two other outcomes, one … Continue reading Can you train yourself to be more optimistic?

Four Natural Memory Boosters

Eat your veggies. You’re not likely to forget this message. Getting adequate vegetables, especially cruciferous ones including broccoli, cabbage and dark leafy greens, may help improve memory. Try a kale salad or substitute collard greens for a tortilla in your next sandwich wrap. Broccoli stir-fry also is an excellent option for lunch or dinner. Be sweet on berries and cherries. Berries — especially dark ones such as blackberries, blueberries and cherries — are a rich source of anthocyanins and other flavonoids that may support memory function. Enjoy a handful of berries for a snack, mixed into cereal or baked into … Continue reading Four Natural Memory Boosters

Calls for ibuprofen sale restrictions after study finds cardiac arrest risk

Over-the-counter drug linked to 31% increased cardiac arrest risk, with the figure rising to 50% for diclofenac, says research There have been fresh calls for restrictions on the sale of the painkiller ibuprofen after another study found it heightens the risk of cardiac arrest. Taking the over-the-counter drug was associated with a 31% increased risk, researchers in Denmark found. Other medicines from the same group of painkillers, known as non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), presented an even higher risk, according to the findings published on Wednesday in the European Heart Journal. Diclofenac, available over the counter in the UK until 2015 … Continue reading Calls for ibuprofen sale restrictions after study finds cardiac arrest risk

Give your Intellect a Spring clean

Our cognitive ability is not fixed. Scores on intelligence tests vary depending on the circumstances at the time of testing – how tired you are, how well nourished, how anxious you are. These are not the only factors that make a difference. Andrew Lim and colleagues at Toronto University carried out tests on 3000 ‘older’ participants at different times of the year to assess cognitive functioning, measuring thinking and concentration skills, as well as physiological tests to look for early signs of Alzheimer’s disease. The outcome was that people who tested in Summer and early Autumn obtained significantly higher scores, … Continue reading Give your Intellect a Spring clean

Do you Imitate?

Do you Imitate? The curiosity of the gentleman who, seeing someone shrug their shoulders, instantaneously and voluntarily, shrugs his own shoulders, has elicited several similar accounts. It may even occur when, for example, watching the news on TV and seeing a person shrug their shoulders – the viewer feels the urge to imitate. Similar such behaviours include waving and blinking, with a further variation of “feeling grievous pain” on hearing someone describe falling over and injuring a limb. This phenomenon has a name, Echopraxia, and could, it is thought, be related to copying behaviours common in infancy.   Continue reading Do you Imitate?